How One Idaho Company Is Making Its Mark On The Plastic Water Bottle Alternative Industry

Earlier this fall, San Francisco International Airport banned the sale of plastic water bottles. SFO is instead stocking its shelves with alternatives: bottles made of aluminum, glass or compostable material. One Idaho-based company is making its mark on the industry: Central Idaho spring water can now be found lining shelves across the nation. But instead of plastic, the water is packaged in brushed aluminum bottles with Proud Source Water’s bright blue logo. “Mackay, Idaho is situated deep in a valley surrounded by the Rocky Mountain Range,” a Proud Source promotional video shares. “This land is our home. We want to help preserve our environment.” Proud Source started bottling in 2017 as an alternative to plastic water bottles. Now, it is one of San Francisco International Airport’s chosen plastic bottle alternatives. SFO spokesperson Doug Yakel says plastic water bottle use has been a problem at the airport for years. Now, this ban is part of its goal to send zero waste to the landfill by 2021. The airport set this goal three years ago, but couldn’t ban the bottles until now. “Back then there really weren’t a lot of good alternatives to plastic water bottles, we ...

Coca-Cola Amatil uses recycled bottles for carbonated beverages

Coca-Cola Amatil has produced carbonated soft drink bottles made from 100% recycled plastic – a move that it describes as “a major step forward” for sustainability. All of Coca-Cola Amatil’s single-serve plastic bottles in Australia will now switch to the new fully recycled materials by the end of 2019. Earlier this year, the bottler announced that 70% of the plastic bottles it uses in Australia will be made from recycled plastic by 2020, reducing the amount of new plastic resin it uses by an estimated 10,000 tonnes each year. “We think every beverage container should be recycled and live again, not become waste in our marine and land environment,” said Alison Watkins, Coca-Cola Amatil managing director. “But pressure inside a soft drink bottle is up to 100 psi, or around three times the pressure in a car tyre. So the bottle for carbonated drinks needs to be much stronger than for still beverages, and that’s been an obstacle in using 100% recycled materials for these types of drinks. Watkins added that community and commercial pressure is driving a rapid take-up of recycled materials in bottling. In January, Coca-Cola Amatil revealed plans to stop distributing plastic drinking s...